An e-zine for happenings of local culture in Milwaukee and elsewhere

Power of Life, Cooperative Performance MKE, Cambrian


Ex-post primordial
Sampled evolutionary specimens
Still figuring
A mass without mass
Weighing ages to come

Matter without mind
Electric only in the sense of latent magnetic pulse
Innate urgency animated

A quake, did it tremble?
A tenuous balance revolved
Axis before axiom
Atomic, molecular plenty

Hell, overtly engorged terrestrial heat
Scortching core reaching the surface level cooled by the mixture
Brittle crust chipped, visual maybe, tactile

Immediate revelry, time scrapped by
Time left an untouched wall marred, beginning and ending with stone’s precursor

Whirring, writhing, withering
Noise emulates music overtaking the silence forgotten

Immolation accidental, the rubber tree burns atmos-spherical perpetution
Pin point projection embraced
Modulation, synth pre-digital crude

Process unaware inherent, deliberate
Radiance angular, a reflection on a plane dimensional, minimal degrees separate

Fragility, steadily craving primal ignorance
Focus waxing in traumatic spectacle
An appendage to paddle, a foot
Thoracic concavity, convex abdominal anterior abnormality

Fading through appearance of spectacle
Moribund trappings, intention escaped vapor
Elements expound

Weather Reaction

Brennen Steines launched season one of Coopertive Performance MKE in stellar fashion, devising and delivering Cambrian through the bodies of Kelly Radermacher and Don Russell. An escapade of process art, within Cambrian, Steines cites art forerunner Richard Serra as an influence. 

Cambrian employs human movement interacting with visual art media and sound design to interpret the Cambrian eon of earth’s archeology. The piece calls on the audiences’ imagination to  concieve 50 million years of organic chemistry at work in time-lapse, played back in a compact and quite desciplined interpretive physical theatre duet. 

When asked of the choice of visual art media Stienes shares, “The choice of media gave the performance the primal feel I wanted to convey.” 

Tectonic Art Movement

Cambrian’s perfomance follows a choeragraphic outline envisioned by Liz Faraglia, expounded upon during the fluid three act with movement improvisation of Russell and Radermacher. 

Steines offers that the subjects perpetualy add to the set design, “Each performance has it’s own unique qualities. Even the set and canvas backdrop evolve with each performance, adding to their overall appearance. We started in rehearsals and let the set take on whatever the performers add to it, without deliberately altering them.”

At the end of the run, a canvas will hold the emotional and creative energy of each performance. 

Sound Escapist 

Claranetist Olivia Valenza, sat behind a small tray topped with a turntable. At her other hand, a controller running to a syth pedal serves to complete her tool set needed to orchestrate a live soundtrack to Cambrian.

Valenza’s claranet envolops the performance in an ambient haze, blended with warped textures of digital and analog undertones. Her accompaniment completes the extensive immersion into this prehistoric world the audience experiences.

End of the Epoch

Cambrian will close this weekend, show times are 6:30p and 8:00p tonite Saturday November 5, and closing performance Sunday November 6, 2016 at 12:00p on the 5th floor of the Marshall Building in the Third Ward, 207 E Buffalo Street.

The performance is viewed in roughly an 18 ft by 18 ft whitebox studio, the director prompts the audience to view the performance as one might a sculpture.

Cooperatice Performance MKE functions as and artist coop, where collectively an artist board selects project pitches from working artists.

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